Toronto Pelvic Health // Tag

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22 Jan

There are a lot of unknowns when going into labour and delivery. Whether it’s your first, second, or third child, every birth is very different, and daunting in its way. Some women hope to have a vaginal delivery,  while others schedule or have emergency C-sections. Both forms of delivery are viable options however they can have different effects on your body postpartum. A cesarean section (C-section) can be life-saving for both the baby and mom. A common misconception is that a C-section is somehow “easier” but that is far from the truth. A C-section is a major surgery, that not only affects your abdominal muscles but also your pelvic floor. In this blog post, we will explore what C-sections are, their impact on the pelvic floor, and the benefits of pelvic floor physiotherapy for women who have had C-sections.

What is a C-section?

A C-section is a surgical procedure that involves delivering a baby through an incision made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus. It is usually performed either if the mother schedules a C-section, which may be for a variety of reasons, or in the case of an emergency. This may be done to save and protect the mother and baby. Some reasons for a C-section include a large baby, breech position, multiple pregnancies, maternal health conditions such as high blood pressure (preeclampsia), or labor not progressing as expected (dilation plateauing).

What impact does a C-Section have on the pelvic floor?

Many people assume that a C-section does not have any impact on the pelvic floor because the baby does not pass through the vagina. However, the pelvic floor can still be affected during a C-section. During the procedure, the surgeon may need to move the bladder and intestines to access the uterus, which can cause temporary weakness and stretching of the pelvic floor muscles. The stretching can also occur due to the weight of the baby pushing down on the pelvic floor during pregnancy. The procedure can also impact the nerves supplying the bladder and bowel, thereby reducing or completely removing your urge to pee. This altered sensation can improve over time, but may sometimes linger for years postpartum. In some cases, the sensation never comes back. 

After the C-section, some women may experience pain and discomfort in the pelvic area, which can be exacerbated by activities such as lifting and carrying their newborn. This can lead to muscle tension and tightness, which can cause further issues down the line.

What are the benefits of pelvic floor physiotherapy after a C-section?

Pelvic floor physiotherapy is a specialized form of physical therapy that focuses on strengthening the pelvic floor muscles, improving their function and flexibility, and treating any pain or discomfort in the pelvic area. It can be very beneficial for women who have had a C-section, as it can help to address any issues that may have arisen due to the surgery.

Mississauga Pelvic Health

How can healing and recovery be improved after a C-Section?

Pelvic floor physiotherapy can help to speed up the healing process after a C-section. It can help to reduce pain and swelling in the pelvic area, improve circulation, and promote tissue regeneration. It can also help to prevent the formation of scar tissue, which can cause discomfort and pain in the pelvic area. Keloid scarring is a type of scarring at the C section where the tissue raises and forms adhesions. This can be painful in some cases or uncomfortable and can impact sensation in the region. 

  • Address bladder and bowel issues

After a C-section, some women may experience bladder and bowel issues such as incontinence, urgency, or difficulty emptying their bladder or bowel.  This may be a product of the nerves being impacted during the surgery or other factors. Pelvic floor physiotherapy can help to address these issues by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles and improving their function. It can also help to retrain the bladder and bowel to function properly and reduce incontinence.

  • Improve sexual function

Many women may experience a decrease in sexual function after a C-section due to pain and discomfort in the pelvic area. This may be due to feelings of pelvic heaviness, perineum discomfort, or scar tissue. Pelvic floor physiotherapy can help to address these issues by reducing pain and discomfort and improving the function of the pelvic floor muscles. This can lead to an improvement in sexual function and overall sexual satisfaction.

Seeing a pelvic therapist post-C-section can also get you back to activities you love doing! This can include running, weight lifting, etc. There is no timeline for how quickly you should be recovering. Our bodies take time to heal postpartum. Your body is not broken, but working with a pelvic therapist can help you feel more like yourself again.

Where can I find a pelvic health physiotherapist in Mississauga?

We have 8 locations with pelvic health physiotherapists to help you.

06 Dec

Triangle Physiotherapy in Mississauga is a full-service clinic that offers specialized services like Pelvic Health Physiotherapy. Our pelvic health physiotherapists are trained professionals who, apart from being experts in their field, are also empathetic individuals who understand the sensitive nature of the conditions that make people seek pelvic health physiotherapy.

Tell me more about your Mississauga Pelvic Health physiotherapists.

Pelvic Health Physiotherapist in Mississauga

Our Mississauga Pelvic Health physiotherapists have training in the field of pelvic health physiotherapy and are committed to providing the best care to the community in Mississauga, be it new moms, women with prolapse or incontinence issues, pessary fittings, labour and delivery support, and more. We also have a pelvic health physiotherapist who is trained to help children. Our pelvic health physiotherapists are also able to help men with their pelvic health issues.

What type of conditions can a pelvic floor physiotherapist treat?

Some of the conditions treated by our Mississauga Pelvic Health physiotherapists are:

  • Incontinence (urinary and fecal) 
  • Pelvic organ prolapse and pessary fittings
  • Constipation
  • Diastasis recti
  • Vaginismus
  • Pelvic pain
  • Pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy and postpartum)
  • Coccydynia (tailbone pain)
  • Pudendal neuralgia
  • Interstitial cystitis
  • Female and Male Sexual dysfunction
  • Prostatitis
  • Rectal pain and dysfunction
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Anal incontinence
  • Anal fissures and fistulas
  • Anal neuralgia
  • Rectal prolapse

I just gave birth recently. How soon should I see a pelvic health physiotherapist

The pelvic floor muscles may get stretched or damaged during delivery, whether by C-Section or vaginal. This may cause issues of the pelvic floor that manifest as urinary or fecal incontinence, urinary urgency or frequency, pain during sexual activity, pelvic organ prolapse, pelvic pain, lower back pain, diastasis recti, or scar pain. Many of these issues can be addresed by pelvic health physiotherapy, however, our pelvic physiotherapists in Mississauga recommend waiting at least six weeks after delivery to allow the body time to heal from childbirth.

Can I speak to a pelvic health physiotherapist in Mississauga prior to booking a consultation?

We can certainly connect you with the best pelvic floor physiotherapist in Mississauga that can answer any questions you may have. Click here to book a discovery call.

Where can I find a pelvic health physiotherapist in Mississauga?

We have 8 locations with pelvic health physiotherapists to help you.

24 May

What is vaginismus?

Vaginismus is a condition where the muscles around the vagina involuntarily contract, making it difficult or impossible to have vaginal penetration.

Do I have vaginismus?

If you answer yes to one or more of the following questions, you must book an appointment with a pelvic health physiotherapist to find out if you have vaginismus.

“Sex is so uncomfortable for me.”

“Why does it hurt to have sex? My doctor cannot find anything wrong with me.”

“Internal pelvic exams are a no for me – they are so painful.”

“My vagina feels like a fort that is impenetrable. I never realized it was vaginismus.”

“I used to have great sex, but now I close up—it burns and stings.”

“When my partner starts to move inside me, it hurts and we have to stop.”

“I don’t wear tampons because they don’t go in.”

What are the symptoms of vaginismus?

 The symptoms may differ between younger and older women, emphasizing the significance of an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment for vaginismus.

The primary symptoms of vaginismus are:

  • Sexual penetration seems physically impossible despite repeated attempts
  • Difficulty inserting tampons from youth even after repeated attempts.
  • Difficulty undergoing internal pelvic/gynecological exam 

What are the causes of Vaginismus?

Mississauga Pelvic Health

The exact causes of vaginismus can vary from person to person, and in many cases, the condition is multifactorial, meaning that multiple factors may contribute to its development. Here are some potential causes and contributing factors:

  1. Psychological factors: Emotional or psychological factors can play a significant role in vaginismus. Past traumatic experiences, such as sexual abuse, rape, or a history of painful intercourse, can contribute to the development of vaginismus. Anxiety, fear, guilt, or negative beliefs about sex can also trigger involuntary muscle contractions.
  2. Fear of pain or discomfort: Some individuals may develop vaginismus due to a fear of pain or discomfort during sexual intercourse. This fear can be based on previous painful experiences, cultural or religious beliefs, or misinformation about sex.
  3. Relationship issues: Difficulties in the relationship, such as poor communication, lack of trust, unresolved conflicts, or sexual problems, can contribute to the development or persistence of vaginismus. Emotional or physical distance between partners can create tension and anxiety during sexual activity.
  4. Cultural or religious factors: Cultural or religious beliefs and practices surrounding sex can influence a person’s perception of sexuality and contribute to the development of vaginismus. Upbringing that emphasizes guilt, shame, or negative attitudes towards sex can lead to involuntary muscle contractions during attempts at vaginal penetration.
  5. Lack of sexual education: Insufficient knowledge or understanding about sexual anatomy, arousal, and relaxation techniques can contribute to vaginismus. Inadequate sexual education may lead to misconceptions, anxiety, and fear surrounding sexual activity.
  6. Medical conditions or infections: Certain medical conditions, such as vaginal infections, urinary tract infections, endometriosis, or pelvic inflammatory disease, can cause pain during sex, leading to the development of vaginismus. Vaginal dryness or atrophy, often associated with menopause, can also contribute to discomfort and muscle tightness.
  7. Traumatic childbirth experiences: Some women may develop vaginismus after experiencing a traumatic childbirth, especially if they had a difficult or painful delivery. The association of vaginal penetration with the traumatic event can trigger involuntary muscle contractions.

What are the treatment options for vaginismus?

Pelvic health physiotherapy is a common treatment option for vaginismus. It involves a physical therapist working with the patient to help relax and strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

Possible treatments include:

  1. Progressive pelvic floor muscle relaxation 
  2. Biofeedback or muscle stimulation
  3. Yoga-based therapy  
  4. Hip mobility work
  5. Lumbar spine mobility work

What can I expect during an assessment and treatment for vaginismus at Triangle Physiotherapy?

Assessment

The first step in pelvic health physiotherapy for vaginismus is usually an assessment of the patient’s pelvic floor muscles. This may involve an internal examination, but the therapist will always seek the patient’s consent and respect their comfort level. 

Treatment

Once the assessment is complete, the therapist will develop a treatment plan tailored to the patient’s needs. This may involve exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles or techniques to help the patient relax those muscles.

Techniques

One common technique used in pelvic health physiotherapy for vaginismus is called progressive muscle relaxation. This involves tensing and then releasing the pelvic floor muscles in a controlled way to help the patient become more aware of them and learn how to control them.

Another technique that may be used is biofeedback. This involves using sensors to monitor the activity of the pelvic floor muscles, which can help the patient learn to control them more effectively.

Overall, pelvic health physiotherapy can be an effective treatment for vaginismus, but it is important to work with a qualified physical therapist who has experience in this area. With patience, persistence, and the right guidance, many people with vaginismus can overcome their condition and enjoy fulfilling sexual relationships.

How do I find a pelvic health physiotherapist near me?

We have 8 locations with pelvic health physiotherapists to help you. Book an Appointment today!

02 May

Written by Roshni Ravi, Pelvic Health Physiotherapist.

Sexual health is an important aspect of overall health and well-being, but it’s not always an easy topic to talk about. Many women experience sexual health dysfunctions at some point in their lives, but they may feel embarrassed or ashamed to seek help by way of pelvic floor physiotherapy. There are currently large gaps in the sexual education provided at the elementary school level. Many sex ed classes are focused on birth control and how terrible periods are.

But there is not enough information, if any, on sexual health conditions and how to seek help. We’ve had a lot of conversations with patients about what they wish they had learned in sex-ed.  In this blog post, we’ll explore some of the most commonly asked questions about sexual health dysfunctions in women and offer some tips for managing them.

What is pelvic floor physiotherapy?

pelvic floor physiotherapy Mississauga

Pelvic floor physiotherapy focuses on treating the muscles, ligaments, and connective tissues of the pelvic floor which is a group of muscles that form a supportive hammock-like structure at the base of the pelvis. They play a key role in maintaining continence, supporting the pelvic organs, and providing stability to the spine and hips.

Pelvic floor physiotherapy involves a range of exercises, manual therapy techniques, and education to help individuals with pelvic floor dysfunction. Common conditions that may benefit from pelvic floor physiotherapy include:

  • urinary and fecal incontinence,
  • pelvic pain,
  • pelvic organ prolapse, and
  • sexual dysfunction.

Why am I suffering from a low libido? Can pelvic floor physiotherapy help?

Many women experience a decrease in sexual desire at some point in their lives. This can be caused by a variety of factors, including stress, hormonal imbalances, and relationship issues. To manage low libido, it’s important to address any underlying issues and make self-care a priority. This can include:

  • practicing stress-management techniques,
  • getting enough sleep, and
  • engaging in regular exercise.

Why does it hurt to have sex?

Painful intercourse, also known as dyspareunia, is a common sexual health dysfunction in women. It can be caused by a variety of factors, including vaginal dryness, infections, and hormonal imbalances. To manage painful intercourse, it’s important to work with a healthcare provider to identify the underlying cause and develop a treatment plan. This may include using:

  • lubricants,
  • treating infections,
  • or using hormonal therapy.

I struggle to orgasm during sex, why does that happen?

Many women struggle to achieve orgasm during sexual activity which can be caused by a variety of factors, including, stress, relationship issues, and hormonal imbalances. To manage orgasmic dysfunction, it’s important to work with a healthcare provider or therapist to address any underlying issues and develop strategies for improving sexual function. This may include:

  • practicing mindfulness or
  • engaging in self-exploration techniques.

My vagina feels like a fort that is impenetrable. Why can I not have sexual intercourse?

Vaginismus is a condition in which the muscles of the vaginal wall contract involuntarily, making intercourse difficult or impossible. It can be caused by a variety of factors, including past trauma and anxiety. To manage vaginismus, it’s important to work with a healthcare provider or therapist to address any underlying issues and develop strategies for managing anxiety and relaxing the pelvic floor muscles.

What is vulvodynia? Do I need pelvic floor physiotherapy?

Vulvodynia is a chronic pain condition that affects the vulva, or external genitalia. It can cause burning, stinging, or itching sensations, and can make sexual activity painful or uncomfortable. To manage vulvodynia, it’s important to work with a healthcare provider to identify the underlying cause and develop a treatment plan. This may include:

  • using topical creams or medications,
  • practicing relaxation techniques, or
  • seeing a pelvic health physiotherapist.

Help! I pee my pants!

Mississauga Pelvic Health

Urinary incontinence is a common condition in which urine leaks from the bladder involuntarily. It can be caused by a variety of factors, including hormonal changes, pregnancy, and pelvic floor dysfunction. To manage urinary incontinence, it’s important to work with a healthcare provider or pelvic floor physiotherapist to develop a treatment plan. This may include:

  • pelvic floor exercises,
  • bladder training, or
  • medications.

What are the signs of menopause?

Menopause can cause a variety of changes in sexual function, including vaginal dryness, decreased libido, and painful intercourse. To manage these changes, it’s important to work with a healthcare provider to develop a treatment plan. This may include:

  • using hormonal therapy,
  • vaginal moisturizers, or
  • engaging in regular sexual activity to maintain pelvic floor health.

Where can I find a pelvic health physiotherapist near me?

We have 8 locations with pelvic health physiotherapists to help you.

In conclusion…

Many women experience sexual health dysfunctions at some point in their lives, but they may feel embarrassed or ashamed to seek help. It’s important to remember that sexual health is an important aspect of overall health and well-being, and it’s important to prioritize it in your self-care routine. If you’re experiencing any issues related to sexual function, don’t hesitate to talk to your healthcare provider or a therapist about your options. Remember, there is help!

Click here to book your consultation with one of our knowledgeable and compassionate pelvic health physiotherapists.

28 Apr

Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy refers to a specific and advanced field within physiotherapy that deals with Pelvic Floor Dysfunction. Pelvic Floor Dysfunction can impact people of any age or gender and the term describes several conditions that may affect the urinary, reproductive, digestive, sexual, and/or stability systems in the pelvis.

Pelvic Health Physiotherapists have post-graduate training in pelvic health and can resolve many pelvic floor issues in people of all genders and ages.

What type of conditions can Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy help women with?

pelvic floor physiotherapy Mississauga

Pelvic Health physiotherapists at our clinics can help women with the following:

  • Pelvic floor and abdominal weakness
  • Bladder and bowel problems
  • Pelvic pain (endometriosis, bowel, bladder pain)
  • Pelvic organ prolapse (POP)
  • Sexual dysfunction, vaginismus, painful intercourse
  • Prenatal and postnatal care
  • Diastasis Recti
  • Labour and delivery prep

Can a pelvic health physiotherapist help men?

Mississauga Pelvic Health

Pelvic Health physiotherapists at our clinics can help men with the following:

  • Pelvic pain
  • Bladder and bowel control problems
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Pre and post prostatectomy

Can your pelvic health physiotherapists help transgender individuals?

Yes, our pelvic health physiotherapists can certainly help transgender individuals.

  • Surgical preparation and recovery post-surgery
  • Pelvic pain – Endometriosis or PCOS
  • Intimacy pain, difficulty with penetration
  • Pregnancy and postnatal care for Trans-parents

Pelvic Floor Assessment – what does it entail?

Your first appointment will last about an hour. Your pelvic health physiotherapist will discuss your medical history, do a thorough pelvic health assessment and propose a detailed individualized treatment plan to achieve your pelvic health goals. The assessment may include an internal examination, with your consent, of course, depending on your condition.

Triangle Physiotherapy and our pelvic health team are passionate about supporting our transgender and intersex community.

What should I bring to my appointment? What should I wear?

Make sure you have filled out the Health Questionnaire sent to you by our booking team. Bring any physician or specialist referrals to test results you may have. Please wear comfortable clothing, there are no specific requirements.

How many sessions will I need?

After your assessment, your physiotherapist will prepare a treatment plan for you and be able to indicate how many appointments you may need to achieve your pelvic health goals.

Can I attend my appointment if I have my period?

Your pelvic health physiotherapist can treat you while you have your period, as long as you are comfortable with it.

How do I book an appointment to see a pelvic health physiotherapist at Triangle Physiotherapy?

Triangle Physiotherapy has pelvic health physiotherapists at the following locations:

05 Apr

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a condition in which there is a descent of the pelvic organs into or through the vaginal or anal canal. This can present as:

  • a visible bulge in the above openings,
  • pressure felt in the pelvic area,
  • incomplete emptying of bladder or bowels,
  • discomfort during intercourse. 
Mississauga Pelvic Helath

The main reason for prolapse is increased pressure on the pelvic floor due to:

– Chronic constipation

– Bearing children

– Pelvic floor weakness due to hormonal imbalance

Conservative non-surgical management is the first line of treatment for POP.

Your pelvic floor physiotherapist will assess the severity of your symptoms, the strength of your pelvic floor and your ability to manage pressure and stresses to your pelvic floor. Treatment would include strengthening exercises for the core and pelvic floor muscles and coordination techniques for all the inner unit muscles. 

The types of pelvic organ prolapse are:

  • Anterior Wall Prolapse
  • Posterior Wall Prolapse
  • Rectal Prolapse

Depending on the grade and type of prolapse, you might be a candidate for a pessary fitting.

Oakville Pelvic Health

A pessary is a medical grade silicone device that is inserted into the vaginal canal in order to support the vaginal walls. If you are a candidate for a pessary, it must be fitted for you by a trained professional such as gynaecologists, nurses that have a certification in fittings or pelvic health physios that are specialized to do so.

We currently have 3 practitioners at Triangle Physiotherapy who are certified in pessary fittings.

Your pelvic floor deserves more than just kegels. Speak to a pelvic health physiotherapist today to get started!

Where can I find a pelvic health physiotherapist near me?

We have 8 locations with pelvic health physiotherapists to help you.

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT TODAY!

16 Feb

Written by Roshni Ravi, Pelvic Health Physiotherapist

Stress incontinence is a type of urinary incontinence that occurs with physical activity or exertion. This can be from coughing, sneezing, laughing or exercise e.g. jumping. All of these actions can put pressure on the bladder thereby causing leaks. The pelvic floor is important in preventing this leaks and supporting the bladder. 

Pelvic floor exercises such as a kegel are commonly recommended for leaks. However, a lot of time the pelvic floor is actually tight rather than weak. Reverse Kegels involve relaxing the pelvic floor muscles, allowing them to lengthen and release tension. This helps to prevent over-tightening and over-activity of the pelvic floor muscles, which can contribute to stress incontinence.

Hypertonic pelvic floor

Hypertonic pelvic floor refers to a condition where the pelvic floor muscles are in a state of excessive and persistent contraction. This can lead to a number of symptoms, including pelvic pain, urinary and fecal incontinence, and sexual dysfunction.

Hypertonic pelvic floor can be caused by a number of factors, including pregnancy, childbirth, surgery, chronic constipation, and chronic pelvic pain. It can also be a result of excessive or improper use of pelvic floor muscle exercises, such as Kegels.

Treatment for Hypertonic pelvic floor

Treatment for hypertonic pelvic floor typically involves a combination of physical therapy and relaxation techniques. Physical therapy may include manual therapy to release muscle tension, as well as exercises to stretch and relax the pelvic floor muscles. Relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and biofeedback, can also be helpful in reducing muscle tension.

If you’re experiencing leaks, reach out to a pelvic floor therapist for an assessment or discovery call!

FAQ’s about Stress Incontinence

Q: What is stress incontinence?

A: Stress incontinence is a type of urinary incontinence that occurs when pressure is placed on the bladder, such as during coughing, sneezing, laughing, or exercising, and causes involuntary urine leakage.

Q: What causes stress incontinence?

A: Stress incontinence is typically caused by weakened pelvic floor muscles and/or a weakened urethral sphincter, which can occur due to aging, pregnancy and childbirth, menopause, obesity, chronic coughing, or certain medical conditions.

Q: Who is at risk for developing stress incontinence?

A: Women are more likely to develop stress incontinence than men, especially those who have gone through pregnancy and childbirth, menopause, or pelvic surgery. Other risk factors include obesity, chronic coughing, and certain medical conditions that affect the bladder or nervous system.

Q: How is stress incontinence diagnosed?

A: Stress incontinence can be diagnosed through a physical exam, a urine test, and other tests such as a bladder diary or urodynamic testing.

Q: What are the treatment options for stress incontinence?

A: Treatment options for stress incontinence may include:

  • pelvic floor exercises,
  • behavioral therapies,
  • medications,
  • medical devices such as pessaries, and in some cases,
  • surgery.

Q: Can stress incontinence be prevented?

A: While stress incontinence may not be completely preventable, there are steps you can take to reduce your risk. Maintaining a healthy weight, doing regular pelvic floor exercises, and avoiding smoking and excessive caffeine consumption are some of these.

Q: Is stress incontinence a normal part of aging?

A: While stress incontinence is more common in older adults, it is not a normal part of aging and should not be ignored or accepted as an inevitable consequence of getting older. Treatment options are available, and seeking help from a healthcare provider is important.

25 Jan

Pelvic Floor Disorders are a common occurrence but the treatments available for pelvic floor dysfunction are not widely known. Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy has been proven to help with Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and this is where we come in! Triangle Physiotherapy has state-of-the-art facilities with private rooms for pelvic health treatments. Your comfort is our priority while addressing this sensitive issue.

Pelvic Floor Muscles & Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

Mississauga Pelvic Health

The pelvic floor is made up of layers of muscles and other tissues. These muscles are stretched end to end from the tailbone to the pubic bone. Sometimes these muscles tend to lose their normal control and cause pelvic floor dysfunction.
Also read, Physiotherapy Clinic in Etobicoke

What causes Pelvic Floor Dysfunction?

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction can be caused by any of the following two conditions:

  1. Hypotonicity – When the pelvic floor muscles become weak and are unable to continue proper functioning, they cause stress incontinence, urge incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse (when a pelvic organ drops from its normal position).
  2. Hypertonicity – When the pelvic floor muscles become tight, leading to urinary and fecal urgency, urge incontinence, chronic pelvic pain, etc., the condition is known as pelvic floor dysfunction.

Also read, Physiotherapy Treatment in Oakville 

What Do We Treat?

We treat a variety of Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions such as:
Conditions in Males

  1. Post-Prostatectomy Incontinence
  2. Pelvic Pain
  3. Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

Conditions in Females

  1. Pelvic Organ Prolapse
  2. Vaginal Pain Syndrome
  3. Urinary Conditions
  4. Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

Musculoskeletal Conditions

  1. Lower Back Pain
  2. Groin/Pubic Pain
  3. Sacroiliac Pain
  4. Piriformis Syndrome

Also read, Physiotherapy Mississauga 
Rectal & Bowel Conditions

  1. Constipation

If you suffer from any of the above-mentioned conditions, you should consider booking an appointment at any one of our 6 clinics in Etobicoke, Oakville, Mississauga, North York, Toronto (King Street) and Toronto (Yonge Street).

How can Pelvic Physiotherapy help me?

Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy can help you with:

  1. Pelvic exercises to gain bladder and bowel control.
  2. Exercises to regain normal muscle strength and tone.
  3. Manual Therapy techniques to help you locate & work your weak pelvic floor muscles.
  4. Tips on good postures.
  5. Identification of other problem areas that might need physiotherapy treatment.
  6. Appropriate lifestyle guidance and recommended changes.

Pelvic Physiotherapy is an effective treatment for solving Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and at Triangle Physiotherapy, our Pelvic Physiotherapists will help you get back to doing the things you love.

17 Nov

What is incontinence?

Incontinence can be a fairly sensitive or embarrassing subject to those who suffer from it. Incontinence is the involuntary loss of urine or feces from the bladder and bowel. But know this, incontinence is an ACCIDENT, it is something that is uncontrollable and can happen to any expecting mother. Urinary incontinence affects around 10-13 million men and women, and it is twice as common in women as in men. Anthony Atala, MD, said, “I would say virtually all pregnant women experience some type of incontinence”. Incontinence should not rule your pregnancy or your life. Mississauga Pelvic Health

What does pregnancy have to do with incontinence?

Pregnancy can interfere with the normal way your urethra relaxes and contracts. You are able to urinate when the muscles around your urethra relax, allowing urine to pass through your bladder and out of your body. After urination, the muscles around your urethra contract, holding off urine flow until your body is ready to urinate again.  Hormone changes during pregnancy and the additional pressure on the bladder from your uterus can cause stress incontinence. Mothers who are experiencing stress incontinence may urinate whilst sneezing, walking, coughing, laughing, running, and during exercise. Women who have a family history of incontinence, gain more weight than recommended during pregnancy, and are over the age of 35 are at higher risk of experiencing incontinence. How do I avoid incontinence during pregnancy?

There are numerous ways to avoid pregnancy incontinence, along with visiting a pelvic health physiotherapist, to avoid leakage.

  1. Schedule your bathroom breaks. Try to make it to the toilet at least every two hours, as when pregnant, women urinate more frequently.
  2. If you think your bathroom visits are proper, try practicing kegel exercises. Kegels help strengthen the pelvic floor. Practicing a kegel is the same as stopping the flow of urine within your urethra. Contract your muscles to the count of ten and then release. Repeat exercises ten to twenty times in a row two to three times a day. The average time to see results is four to eight weeks of regular practice.
  3. Watching your weight while carrying has a significant effect on developing incontinence.  Women who gain more weight during pregnancy are more likely to experience incontinence. Combining these factors with your pelvic physiotherapist will lower your risk of developing incontinence during your pregnancy, allowing your experience to be worry-free.
If you are still unsure or worried about the risk of incontinence during your pregnancy, contact a pelvic floor physiotherapist at Triangle Physiotherapy. Triangle Physiotherapy has eight convenient locations: Etobicoke, Oakville, Mississauga, North York, Toronto, and King West. At Triangle Physiotherapy, our team is compromised of professionals who love what they do. Triangle staff will ensure that you will have a safe and comfortable pregnancy while in their care, and will help get your pregnancy back on track and in your hands.

Click HERE to book an appointment with a physiotherapist at one of our eight locations.

02 Mar

A Diastasis Recti Abdominus is a separation in the 6-pack muscle, the rectus abdominis.

How does it occur?
It most often occurs during pregnancy. Sometimes it will spontaneously correct following birth, but it does not always.
It can also occur with overstretch of abdominal musculature.

Why is it a problem?
There is no pain with this condition.
However, the abdominal wall and the core will become weak. Your abdominals work with your pelvic floor, so a separation of your rectus abdominis muscles can make your pelvic floor less efficient and may result in prolapse and incontinence.Your abdominals also work with your lower back musculature, therefore it can lead to lower back pain.

How do I know if I have a Rectus Diastasis?
If you lift your head while lying on your back and the center of your belly protrudes out, you may have a rectus diastasis. It is measured by the number of fingers you can fit between the muscle when lying on your back and lifting your head. Normal is 1/2 a finger above and below the belly button, and one finger at the belly button.

How do I treat it?
If the abdominal separation is greater than 4 fingers, an abdominal binder is recommended. If you use an abdominal binder, it should be from your hip bones to your rib cage, you need to keep the binder on 24/7. You can only take the binder off when you do your correction exercise below, or when you take a shower. You should keep it on at bedtime.

To get your pelvic health assessed, schedule a consultation with a pelvic floor physiotherapist at Triangle Physiotherapy!

Written by: Kamand Zendeganidoost, Registered Physiotherapist