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Category: Heel

What are Orthotics?

What are Orthotics?

What are orthotics? Orthotics are custom made inserts that are worn inside your shoe to control abnormal foot function. Orthotics solve a number of biomechanically related problems, for example, ankle and knee pain, pelvis, hip, spinal pain. This is achieved by preventing misalignment of the foot, which significantly alters the way in which the bones move within their joints. How are custom orthotics made? The process starts with the physiotherapist conducting a Biomechanical Gait analysis on a GaitScan system which…

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Pacifying the Pain – All about Patella Tendon Tears

Pacifying the Pain – All about Patella Tendon Tears

Pacifying the Pain – All about Patella Tendon Tears Despite it being named a “Tendon”, the patella tendon is both a ligament and a tendon. It connects to two different bones, the patella and the tibia. The patella tendon works in unison with the quadricepmuscles and quadricep tendons allowing them to straighten the knee. The tear within the patella tendon is either partial or complete and can be a disabling injury: Partial tear- More frayed and not complete, (think of…

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Combatting Shin Splints

Combatting Shin Splints

What exactly is shin splints? Are they treatable? Shin splints is a condition characterized by damage and inflammation of the connective tissue joining muscles to the inner shin bone (tibia). Shin splints are known by many different names such as: Medial Tibial Tenoperiostitus, MTSS, Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome, Tenoperiostitus of the Shin, Inflammatory Shin Pain, Traction Periostitis, and Posterior Shin Splint Syndrome. Several muscles lie at the back of the lower leg, and are collectively known as the calf muscles….

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Running from Jumpers Knee

Running from Jumpers Knee

Patellar tendinopathy (also known as: patellar tendonitis, and tendonitis) is an overuse injury affecting the knee. The patella tendon is a short but very wide tendon that runs from the patella (kneecap) to the top of the tibia. It works with the muscles at the front of the thigh to extend the knee so it can perform physical acts like kicking, running, and jumping.  Due to these elements, the patellar tendon has to absorb a lot of this loading and…

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Overcoming Stress from Hairline Fractures

Overcoming Stress from Hairline Fractures

There are many forms of fractures, each causing a dilemma in our lives and requiring the help of a physiotherapist in order to heal safely and properly. One of the most common types of fractures seen in sports medicine today is called a “hairline” or “stress” fracture. Hairline fractures are caused by repetitive strain and excess training. Hairline fractures are minute cracks on the bones, which can become severe if not immediately treated.  The main causes of a hairline fractures…

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Battling Against ALS with Physiotherapy

Battling Against ALS with Physiotherapy

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common type of adult- onset motor neuron disease.  Neurological disorders are characterized primarily by progressive degeneration and loss of motor neurons. ALS involves upper and lower motor neurons and presents as an idiopathic , progressive degeneration of anterior horn cells and their associated neurons, resulting in progressive muscle weakness, atrophy, and fasciluations. ALS is a gradual onset disease. The first initial symptoms of ALS varies person to person. One person may have trouble…

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Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis

What is Plantar Fasciitis? Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Plantar fasciitis is a repetitive strain injury to the plantar surface of the foot. Tiny micro tears can develop in the ligament with repetitive use. This condition is most common in middle-aged populations however you can develop it at any age. It occurs in people who are on their feet a lot such as athletes and construction workers. You can develop plantar fasciitis in one or…

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